Kerala Nazranee Pesaha Receipes
Mar16

Kerala Nazranee Pesaha Receipes

The following are recipes for certain unique Kerala Nazranee Pesaha dishes, from different sources/individuals as duly acknowledged after each recipe. Such or similar dishes were and are part of the Pesaha (Maundy Thursday) supper in several Nazranee families in India and overseas. The tradition is thus kept alive by them. 1. Pesaha Appam (Unleavened Bread Kerala Nazranee Style!) Rice -1.5 cups Urad Dal withot skin – 0.5 cup Cumin seeds – 0.5 teaspoon Garlic – 2 cloves Coconut, shredded – 1 cup Salt – as needed Soak the rice overnight on Wednesday evening. Heat Urad Dal in a frying pan, stirring continuously. Be careful so that it does not burn. Stop heating when golden brown. Stir and let it cool. Soak this Dal for 2 hours. Grind all ingredients together. Add water just enough for a viscous batter. Do not grind to a fine paste. The batter should be slightly lumpy. Taste and add salt as needed. Pour in a baking dish. Steam for 20 minutes. Alternatively, bake at 400 F. Allow it to cool before serving with Pesaha Pal (see below).1 _________________________________________________________________________ 2. Pesaha Pal (Kerala Nazranee innovation for Wine!) Coconut Milk – 2 cups (alternatively, use regular milk) Putt flour – 1 table spoon (alternatively, use Cream of Wheat flour) Brown Sugar – 2 to 3 tablespoons Cardamom (powdered) – 2 Salt – for taste Mix flour and milk in a saucepan. Add brown sugar. Boil for 3-5 minutes until thickened like gravy. Add salt and test for taste. Adjust thickness by adding more flour or milk as needed. Add cardamom. Keep stirring till it cools. Serve with Appam (see above).2 __________________________________________________________________________ 3. Pesaha Appam (This is said to be the way the Pesaha Appam is made in the southern side of Kottayam) (For One Deep Dish) (10-12 pcs.) Rice Flour – 2 Cups Cream of Rice – ½ cup (Option: Soak 2 cups, ie. 1 pound long grain rice in water for 3 hrs, grind coarse, 1 cup grated coconut. Use the coconut water to grind the rice.) Coconut, grated – 1 cup (Blended) Dark Brown sugar – ½ cup (More for more sweetness) Yeast + Sugar – ¼ Tsp + 1 tsp sugar in ¼ cup warm water (Instead of yeast, save the coconut milk with 1 tsp raw rice grains, 1 tsp sugar , keep it in a warm place for a day, use that mixture to grind the rice. Also, if vellom (chakkara) is used,no yeast is needed. Or, one cup (pressed, not loose) of the crust-free soft bread could be used in place of yeast.) 1 Table spoon farina boiled in ½...

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‘East of the Euphrates- Early Christianity in Asia’ by T.V. Philip
Jun30

‘East of the Euphrates- Early Christianity in Asia’ by T.V. Philip

Note on the Author: (The late) Dr. T.V. Philip, a noted Mar Thoma (St. Thomas) Nazranee Church Historian, had worked and taught in India, Europe, USA and Australia; his former students include many among the senior clergy and bishops of several Mar Thoma Nazranee Syrian (Syriac) Christian denominations. Dr. Philip had served as Professor at the United Theological College, Bangalore, Professor of Church History and Director, Board of Theological Education in India and Dean of Trinity Theological College in Brisbane, Australia. He has authored several publications, including “East of the Euphrates” outlining the spread of ancient Christianity in the east. Content Summary: While Paul and other missionaries were converting Greeks, Romans and the barbarian tribes in the west, there was equally a movement of Christianity to the East – Edessa, Persia, Arabia, Central Asia, China and India. Though the evidence of the presence of Christianity in some of the South East and East Asian countries is scanty and fragmentary, there is sufficient evidence to show that Christianity was present in Ceylon, Burma, Indonesia and Korea before the arrival of the western missionaries. It is a surprise to many people to learn that there was a large and widespread Christian community throughout the whole of Central Asia and that such countries as Afghanistan and Tibet which are considered today as lands closed to Christianity were once centres of Christian activity. This book is an introduction to the exciting and fascinating story of the movement of the gospel in Asian lands, east of the Euphrates. It explores the missionary impulses of the early Asian Christian communities and the theology that motivated them. It discusses the reason for its decline by AD 1500, after a millennium and a half of heroic efforts and phenomenal growth. Introduction A general and brief introduction to the exciting and fascinating story of the movement of the Christian Gospel in Asian lands. Christianity came to Asia in the first century itself. Chapter 1: ASIA: THE CRADLE OF CHRISTIANITY 1-12 A History Ignored 1 Jewish Christianity and its Characteristics 5 St. Thomas: The Apostle of the East 9 No contemporary historian has recorded the Gospel’s eastward march, but there is no doubt that the Gospel did move east even while Paul was opening his mission in Europe. And however Western scholars may write their histories of the church, from time immemorial Asia has linked the church’s expansion eastward to the missionary travels of the apostle Thomas. Chapter 2: CHRISTIANITY IN EDESSA 13-36 Origins of Christianity in Edessa 14 Characteristics of Early East Syrian Christianity 17 Church Life in the Third Century 27 East Syrian Church and Monasticism 30...

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